Ask An Expert: Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood, an independent International Arbitrator based in Houston, Texas, provides her insight into the the issues of transparency, data and diversity in the international arbitration field.

What is your current role?

After spending the past 20 years in practice with two major international law firms, I have recently transitioned to become a full time arbitrator.

I joined Linklaters as a trainee in 1996, qualified as a litigator in London in 1998 and rather fell into the practice of international arbitration shortly thereafter. The firm needed an associate to relocate with a partner to the Paris office to establish an international arbitration presence there and asked me to go.  Continue reading

Can We Still Be Friends? London As A Global Seat Of Arbitration Post-Brexit

broken Wedding Rings symbolize the BrexitMichael McIlwrath, Global Chief Litigation Counsel for GE Oil & Gas opened his recent article An Unamicable Separation: Brexit Consequences for London as a Premier Seat of International Dispute Resolution in Europe with the following quote, attributed to the most prolific of all authors, ‘unknown’:

“I try not to think of divorce as failing at marriage but rather winning at bitterness and resentment.” Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Diego Gosis

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Diego Gosis, an Arbitrator and a Florida Foreign Legal Consultant at GST LLP in Miami, speaks about the digitalisation of dispute resolution and the benefits of increased cultural diversity in the field.

What is your current role in dispute resolution?

I am a provider and an advisor of dispute resolution services. I work as counsel and arbitrator in international commercial and investment disputes.

I became interested in developing a career in dispute resolution when I realised that it was an area of practice where your success most depends on your legal skills, as opposed to the size of your firm or other non-legal factors. Also, it is one of the most international areas of practice, and the prospect of learning about and arguing issues under a variety of legal regimes was an interesting challenge. Continue reading

Matching Arbitrators To Party Expectations

Dice dropped into the water, on a white background.

Reacting to a discussion at Vienna Arbitration Days 2016, Lucy Greenwood, Michael McIlwrath and I published an article ‘Puppies or Kittens – How To Better Match Arbitrators to Party Expectations’ calling for better-informed choices in appointing arbitrators.

We analysed the arbitrator selection process, and proposed that the lack of available information on arbitrator’s soft skills and procedural preferences often leaves parties disappointed. Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Paul Key QC

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New Zealand born Paul Key QC, an international arbitration specialist at Essex Court Chambers in London, discusses innovation, challenges and new trends in dispute resolution.

What is your role in dispute resolution?

I am a barrister based in London. I work as an advocate and as an arbitrator in international commercial arbitrations and investment treaty arbitrations. I also do court work, largely (though not exclusively) related to arbitral disputes.

The disputes in which I am involved usually have some high-value and cross-border commercial aspect to them. My clients are typically large commercial entities, states and very high net-worth individuals. Like most people who do this work, my work as an advocate involves work for both claimants and respondents. The arbitrations in which I am involved take place in various places around the world (e.g. New York, Geneva, Singapore, Vienna and Sydney) and my work involves frequent travel.

I became interested in dispute resolution for various reasons, including reasons of personal intellectual interest and social justice reasons. I like solving puzzles and dispute resolution always presents a number of puzzles that need to be solved, both in terms of legal issues and in terms of factual issues. However, I also wanted to assist people and entities to achieve justice and to be able to resolve their disputes in a fair and equitable manner.  Continue reading

It’s A Numbers Game: Diversity And Inclusion In International Dispute Resolution

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As a largely private mechanism for dispute resolution, international commercial arbitration has been shielded from scrutiny in relation to the composition of its arbitral tribunals. For years, the arbitration institutions did not publish data in relation to the gender, nationality or race of arbitrators appointed to hear disputes. However, this situation is changing. Continue reading

London After Brexit: Business As Usual?

londonReading the headlines, Brexit-ing Britain may appear a hostile place – the public, we are told, favours being told the number of foreigners being employed by companies in Britain, and academics at the London School of Economics find that they are debarred from giving their non-British opinion on Brexit, lest, one assumes, they steal  bread from the mouths of native political scientists.

It would be careless, therefore, for lawyers not to ask what impact Brexit would have on the UK as a seat of arbitration. As it stands, the UK- or more specifically, London – is clearly an attractive seat for arbitration proceedings, being the home of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, the London Court of International Arbitration, and the London Maritime Arbitrators Association. Continue reading