Ask An Expert: Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood, an independent International Arbitrator based in Houston, Texas, provides her insight into the the issues of transparency, data and diversity in the international arbitration field.

What is your current role?

After spending the past 20 years in practice with two major international law firms, I have recently transitioned to become a full time arbitrator.

I joined Linklaters as a trainee in 1996, qualified as a litigator in London in 1998 and rather fell into the practice of international arbitration shortly thereafter. The firm needed an associate to relocate with a partner to the Paris office to establish an international arbitration presence there and asked me to go.  Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Julian Copeman

julian-copeman

Julian Copeman, Managing Partner of Herbert Smith Freehills’ Greater China offices, discusses dispute resolutions trends, data and the increasing role of technology in resolving disputes.

 

 

 

 

What do you hope the GPC will achieve?

The intention for Hong Kong GPC was to bring together stakeholders from across the disputes market to discuss the issues that face parties at the front line of disputes in Hong Kong, and indeed over 200 people attended on the day. We gained rich and valuable data and from that, we are hoping, will reach some real and tangible recommendations for change.  Continue reading

A Brief Look At The Empirical Findings On International Arbitration: A Summary

ilsnkt1imxe-mari-helin-tuominen.jpgThe original article Empirical Findings on International Arbitration: An Overview by Christopher R. Drahozal from the University of Kansas, discusses newly (and not so new) available international arbitration data generated through arbitration institutions, scholarly research, or commentator analysis Continue reading

Matching Arbitrators To Party Expectations

Dice dropped into the water, on a white background.

Reacting to a discussion at Vienna Arbitration Days 2016, Lucy Greenwood, Michael McIlwrath and I published an article ‘Puppies or Kittens – How To Better Match Arbitrators to Party Expectations’ calling for better-informed choices in appointing arbitrators.

We analysed the arbitrator selection process, and proposed that the lack of available information on arbitrator’s soft skills and procedural preferences often leaves parties disappointed. Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Andi Daze

Andi Daze.jpg

Andi Daze, Partner at D & D Partners in Lagos, Nigeria – where he was also instrumental in organising the Lagos GPC event. Here, he discusses the importance of data gathering in dispute resolution, his motivations and his experience as an organiser.

Would you primarily describe yourself as an advisor, user or provider of dispute resolution?

As an attorney, I would categorise myself as an advisor under the GPC’s stakeholder groups. Having trained and qualified as a lawyer in Nigeria, New York, as well as in England and Wales, I have been involved in both contentious and non-contentious legal practice across all three jurisdictions.

Currently based in Lagos, Nigeria, I have developed a track record in both transactional and general legal advisory. I have anchored a wide range of transactions on behalf of local and multinational public and private organisations from legal audits and corporate restructuring to sports and entertainment transactions. Continue reading

Are hostile mediators more effective?

whistle of a refereeNew research by Francesca Gino and Ting Zhang of Columbia Business School, along with Mike Norton of Harvard Business School, suggests that the most effective mediation style might be being partial against both parties.

The academics suggest that, contrary to the received wisdom that mediators should be neutral, attentive and empathetic, an actively hostile mediator is more likely to get a good result. They discovered that a mediator’s antagonistic and hostile treatment of both parties causes adversaries to unite against the mediator, which in turn increases the parties’ willingness and propensity to reach agreement. Continue reading

Counting Mediators: Key Trends In International Mediation

Single blue pawn figure between red and yellow groupsThe International Mediation Institute (IMI) published the results of their 2016 International Mediation & ADR Survey this week.

The survey focused on collecting census data, as well as views on awareness of mediation and alternative dispute resolution (ADR). Over 800 participants completed the census survey, including users of mediation services, mediators, advisors, educators, students, providers and other stakeholders.

With very little statistical data available in this area, the results, according to IMI have been “particularly insightful and eye opening”. Continue reading