Ask An Expert: Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood, an independent International Arbitrator based in Houston, Texas, provides her insight into the the issues of transparency, data and diversity in the international arbitration field.

What is your current role?

After spending the past 20 years in practice with two major international law firms, I have recently transitioned to become a full time arbitrator.

I joined Linklaters as a trainee in 1996, qualified as a litigator in London in 1998 and rather fell into the practice of international arbitration shortly thereafter. The firm needed an associate to relocate with a partner to the Paris office to establish an international arbitration presence there and asked me to go.  Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Julian Copeman

julian-copeman

Julian Copeman, Managing Partner of Herbert Smith Freehills’ Greater China offices, discusses dispute resolutions trends, data and the increasing role of technology in resolving disputes.

 

 

 

 

What do you hope the GPC will achieve?

The intention for Hong Kong GPC was to bring together stakeholders from across the disputes market to discuss the issues that face parties at the front line of disputes in Hong Kong, and indeed over 200 people attended on the day. We gained rich and valuable data and from that, we are hoping, will reach some real and tangible recommendations for change.  Continue reading

Can We Still Be Friends? London As A Global Seat Of Arbitration Post-Brexit

broken Wedding Rings symbolize the BrexitMichael McIlwrath, Global Chief Litigation Counsel for GE Oil & Gas opened his recent article An Unamicable Separation: Brexit Consequences for London as a Premier Seat of International Dispute Resolution in Europe with the following quote, attributed to the most prolific of all authors, ‘unknown’:

“I try not to think of divorce as failing at marriage but rather winning at bitterness and resentment.” Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Joe Liu

joe-liuJoe Liu, Managing Counsel at the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre, speaks about transparency, education and trends in Asia’s dispute resolution market.

What is your current role in dispute resolution?

The Hong Kong International arbitration Centre (HKIAC) is a service provider. We provide a wide range of dispute resolution services – arbitration, mediation, adjudication and domain name dispute resolution. I was previously in private practice and throughout my career I have specialised in international commercial and treaty arbitrations. Continue reading

When arbitration is used and why

photo-1431540015161-0bf868a2d407-1In almost all instances, arbitration must be contemplated at the contract drafting stage. Parties may, of course, agree to take a dispute to arbitration at any stage, but once a dispute has broken out, positions become polarised, and agreement is accordingly less likely.

The reasons for preferring arbitration clauses to the more usual reference to the courts – in a commercial context – boil down to the so-called “three Es”: expedition, expertise and enforcement. Continue reading

London After Brexit: Business As Usual?

londonReading the headlines, Brexit-ing Britain may appear a hostile place – the public, we are told, favours being told the number of foreigners being employed by companies in Britain, and academics at the London School of Economics find that they are debarred from giving their non-British opinion on Brexit, lest, one assumes, they steal  bread from the mouths of native political scientists.

It would be careless, therefore, for lawyers not to ask what impact Brexit would have on the UK as a seat of arbitration. As it stands, the UK- or more specifically, London – is clearly an attractive seat for arbitration proceedings, being the home of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, the London Court of International Arbitration, and the London Maritime Arbitrators Association. Continue reading