Podcast For Parity With Mirèze Philippe

MicrophoneTo celebrate International Women’s Day this year, the GQUAL campaign – which focuses on achieving gender parity in international tribunals and bodies – created a podcast series entitled Podcast for Parity in collaboration with the American University’s Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at the Washington College of Law.

In this particular podcast, GQUAL speaks to Special Counsel at the Secretariat of the ICC International Court of Arbitration and ArbitralWomen co-founder, Mirèze Philippe, about her organisation’s work, raising awareness and tackling unconscious bias.

To listen to the podcast please click here or on the picture above.

This podcast was first aired on 9 March 2017, you can find the original post here.

Matching Arbitrators To Party Expectations

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Reacting to a discussion at Vienna Arbitration Days 2016, Lucy Greenwood, Michael McIlwrath and I published an article ‘Puppies or Kittens – How To Better Match Arbitrators to Party Expectations’ calling for better-informed choices in appointing arbitrators.

We analysed the arbitrator selection process, and proposed that the lack of available information on arbitrator’s soft skills and procedural preferences often leaves parties disappointed. Continue reading

It’s A Numbers Game: Diversity And Inclusion In International Dispute Resolution

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As a largely private mechanism for dispute resolution, international commercial arbitration has been shielded from scrutiny in relation to the composition of its arbitral tribunals. For years, the arbitration institutions did not publish data in relation to the gender, nationality or race of arbitrators appointed to hear disputes. However, this situation is changing. Continue reading

Ask An Expert: S.I. Strong

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S.I. Strong, Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law and Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution at the University of Missouri and an international commercial arbitration specialist, speaks about her career and discusses the rise of international commercial mediation and the increase in multiparty arbitration.

What is your current role in dispute resolution?

As a full-time law professor and arbitrator, I would categorise myself as primarily an advisor.

I got involved in international dispute resolution my first year in practice in New York – I was very interested in private international and comparative law, but I didn’t want to go into transactional practice. My firm became involved in what was then the largest ICC (International Chamber Commerce) arbitration in history, and I had the opportunity to see how complex international arbitration was. From that moment, I was hooked.

In the last few years, I have also become interested in international commercial mediation, based on the work I am doing with the US State Department and UNCITRAL on the new proposed convention on settlement agreements arising out of international commercial mediations. Continue reading