Podcast For Parity With Mirèze Philippe

MicrophoneTo celebrate International Women’s Day this year, the GQUAL campaign – which focuses on achieving gender parity in international tribunals and bodies – created a podcast series entitled Podcast for Parity in collaboration with the American University’s Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at the Washington College of Law.

In this particular podcast, GQUAL speaks to Special Counsel at the Secretariat of the ICC International Court of Arbitration and ArbitralWomen co-founder, Mirèze Philippe, about her organisation’s work, raising awareness and tackling unconscious bias.

To listen to the podcast please click here or on the picture above.

This podcast was first aired on 9 March 2017, you can find the original post here.

Ask An Expert: Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood, an independent International Arbitrator based in Houston, Texas, provides her insight into the the issues of transparency, data and diversity in the international arbitration field.

What is your current role?

After spending the past 20 years in practice with two major international law firms, I have recently transitioned to become a full time arbitrator.

I joined Linklaters as a trainee in 1996, qualified as a litigator in London in 1998 and rather fell into the practice of international arbitration shortly thereafter. The firm needed an associate to relocate with a partner to the Paris office to establish an international arbitration presence there and asked me to go.  Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Julian Copeman

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Julian Copeman, Managing Partner of Herbert Smith Freehills’ Greater China offices, discusses dispute resolutions trends, data and the increasing role of technology in resolving disputes.

 

 

 

 

What do you hope the GPC will achieve?

The intention for Hong Kong GPC was to bring together stakeholders from across the disputes market to discuss the issues that face parties at the front line of disputes in Hong Kong, and indeed over 200 people attended on the day. We gained rich and valuable data and from that, we are hoping, will reach some real and tangible recommendations for change.  Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Joe Liu

joe-liuJoe Liu, Managing Counsel at the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre, speaks about transparency, education and trends in Asia’s dispute resolution market.

What is your current role in dispute resolution?

The Hong Kong International arbitration Centre (HKIAC) is a service provider. We provide a wide range of dispute resolution services – arbitration, mediation, adjudication and domain name dispute resolution. I was previously in private practice and throughout my career I have specialised in international commercial and treaty arbitrations. Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Diego Gosis

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Diego Gosis, an Arbitrator and a Florida Foreign Legal Consultant at GST LLP in Miami, speaks about the digitalisation of dispute resolution and the benefits of increased cultural diversity in the field.

What is your current role in dispute resolution?

I am a provider and an advisor of dispute resolution services. I work as counsel and arbitrator in international commercial and investment disputes.

I became interested in developing a career in dispute resolution when I realised that it was an area of practice where your success most depends on your legal skills, as opposed to the size of your firm or other non-legal factors. Also, it is one of the most international areas of practice, and the prospect of learning about and arguing issues under a variety of legal regimes was an interesting challenge. Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Andi Daze

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Andi Daze, Partner at D & D Partners in Lagos, Nigeria – where he was also instrumental in organising the Lagos GPC event. Here, he discusses the importance of data gathering in dispute resolution, his motivations and his experience as an organiser.

Would you primarily describe yourself as an advisor, user or provider of dispute resolution?

As an attorney, I would categorise myself as an advisor under the GPC’s stakeholder groups. Having trained and qualified as a lawyer in Nigeria, New York, as well as in England and Wales, I have been involved in both contentious and non-contentious legal practice across all three jurisdictions.

Currently based in Lagos, Nigeria, I have developed a track record in both transactional and general legal advisory. I have anchored a wide range of transactions on behalf of local and multinational public and private organisations from legal audits and corporate restructuring to sports and entertainment transactions. Continue reading

Ask An Expert: Paul Key QC

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New Zealand born Paul Key QC, an international arbitration specialist at Essex Court Chambers in London, discusses innovation, challenges and new trends in dispute resolution.

What is your role in dispute resolution?

I am a barrister based in London. I work as an advocate and as an arbitrator in international commercial arbitrations and investment treaty arbitrations. I also do court work, largely (though not exclusively) related to arbitral disputes.

The disputes in which I am involved usually have some high-value and cross-border commercial aspect to them. My clients are typically large commercial entities, states and very high net-worth individuals. Like most people who do this work, my work as an advocate involves work for both claimants and respondents. The arbitrations in which I am involved take place in various places around the world (e.g. New York, Geneva, Singapore, Vienna and Sydney) and my work involves frequent travel.

I became interested in dispute resolution for various reasons, including reasons of personal intellectual interest and social justice reasons. I like solving puzzles and dispute resolution always presents a number of puzzles that need to be solved, both in terms of legal issues and in terms of factual issues. However, I also wanted to assist people and entities to achieve justice and to be able to resolve their disputes in a fair and equitable manner.  Continue reading